Archive for June, 2009

source | non-english – The director of the hospital Malvinas Argentinas, Graciela Bonfigli, has told C5N that patients are now in serious condition suffering from acute renal failure and hematologic disorders.

Graciela Bonfigli, director of the Hospital Malvinas Argentinas, instead aiming only to patients who have the virus AH1N1 spoke exclusively with C5N and explained that, in very serious cases, two new symptoms are presenting in patients.

The first is acute renal failure, which has to be treated with dialysis.

The second is the occurrence of hematological abnormalities, such as when blood clots form throughout the body.

Furthermore argued that if patients have no prior history, they are generally healthy adults who have a fall with pneumonia and respiratory failure.



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source | A Hamilton woman infected with the H1N1 influenza has died, this city’s first fatality from the spreading pandemic virus.

The woman, 41, passed away in hospital on Monday, and had what medical officials call “underlying health conditions.”



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source | TORONTO — Ontario is now reporting 11 deaths associated with the swine flu.

An 81-year-old Toronto woman and a 41-year-old Hamilton woman who had chronic health problems both tested positive for the virus.

Ministry of Health officials say the elderly woman had been in hospital in intensive care for some time.



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source | Health officials have decided to change their strategies for treating swine flu given that the virus has become the most prevalent flu strain in Hong Kong.

From tomorrow, hospitals will no longer admit every swine flu patient and only some patients will be offered the antiviral Tamiflu.

Centre for Health Protection controller Thomas Tsang Ho-fai yesterday said the A(H1N1) flu had become the dominant strain of flu virus in Hong Kong, accounting for more than 70 per cent of flu samples tested at the centre last week compared with 20 per cent in the first week of June. In addition, one in eight outpatients attending the Hospital Authority’s designated flu clinics had tested positive for the virus, he said.



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source | Long Island’s Suffolk County has recorded a fourth death linked to swine flu.

County health officials said Tuesday the victim, a Smithtown man between the ages of 45 and 55, had underlying medical problems.

Suffolk Health Commissioner Dr. Humayun Chaudhry (HOO’-mah-yoon CHAW’-dree) says the man died Tuesday and had been hospitalized since mid-June.



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source | He had to start with no ill. That was in the preventive treatment with Tamiflu, because he had been in close contact with a swine influenza hit abroad. Since there had been five days of Tamiflu, the person suddenly ill with H1N1, but it not appear that the medicine worked. It appeared as through the samples here and in England that the person had been resistance, “says Nils Strandberg.

The above translation provides additional information on the patient who developed a pandemic H1N1 infection while taking a prophylactic dose of oseltamivir (Tamiflu). The five days suggests the patient was infected after her contact, who was infected overseas, returned. The patient was given Tamiflu because of her infected contact and developed flu-like symptoms while taking Tamiflu, which led to the isolation of the virus and sequence data (generated in Denmark and England) showing resistance (which was almost certainly H274Y).

The above description made no mention of an isolate from the patient who traveled overseas and no indication that an isolate was collected. Therefore, it is highly unlikely that a wild type sequence from the overseas traveler or the patient with resistant H1N1 exist. This absence was also signaled by statements from Roche and other agencies who used the qualifiers of “appears” and “probably” when describing the develop of resistance, because there is no evidence that resistance developed in the patient in Denmark.

A more likely scenario involves the silent spread of oseltamivir resistant H1N1. Denmark, like most countries in Europe, has focused on detection of H1N1 in travelers and contacts. Consequently, the number of H1N1 positive cases has been low. Although countries have been making sequences public shortly have collection of isolates, the number of public pandemic H1N1 sequences from Denmark at Genbank or GISAID remains at one. The NA sequence has been released and it is wild type. However, the isolate was collected from a patient in April, so there are no recent public sequences from Denmark.

[...]

Airport screening will only detect a small subset of infected patients, because those infected shortly prior to travel will not yet have symptoms and about 30% of infected patients don’t develop a high fever. Moreover, others take medication for flu-like symptoms, which lowers fevers. Thus, infected patients have been flying into these countries undetected for months, and community spread is significant, but not reported because of a lack of testing.



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source | Two more Philadelphia residents have died of complications related to swine flu, officials with the city Department of Public Health said last night.

Both patients – a man and a woman – were described only as middle-aged adults with underlying medical conditions whose infections were confirmed posthumously late last week.

The deaths in Philadelphia, only one of which was included in yesterday’s update by the state Department of Health, were the fourth and fifth in Pennsylvania attributed to influenza A(H1N1). and the third in Philadelphia.



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source | Three more people died in Argentina after contracting influenza A, reported the chief of medicine at the Italian Hospital in Buenos Aires Alejandra Valledor during an interview to a local radio.

The physician said the victims have “not been included” in the lists of influenza A fatalities made by the Health Ministry. Valledor claimed the government is “underreporting” the number of deaths and cases. The Health Minister has confirmed 29 deaths.

She added that hospitals in different parts of the country have been “overcrowded” due to the large number of patients who contacted the deadly illness.

Sources of the Emergency Room of the Argerich hospital told The Herald it had “collapsed” as a result of the large number of cases, and added that breathing machines might not be enough to cope with the growing demand.

At least people have died of swine flu in that hospital in the city of Buenos Aires, including a 25-year-old man, the source added, describing the “incredibly speed of the illness, which leads people to cough to death in a matter of days.”



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source | Six people have died from swine flu in New Jersey.

The state Health and Senior Services Department says the latest victim is a woman in her 40s from Bergen County who had underlying health conditions.

The five others in New Jersey who have died from the H1N1 virus include a 79-year-old Hudson County woman, a 36-year-old Union County man, a 15-year-old Somerset County boy, a 10-year-old Sussex County boy and a 49-year-old northern New Jersey man.



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source | A 19-year-old girl died of of the H1N1 influenza Tuesday in Madrid, becoming the first victim of the disease known as swine flu on continental Europe, the Spanish Health Ministry said.

Three people have died on the British Isles of the disease.

The girl, of North African origin, who also suffered from asthma, was 28 weeks pregnant. Doctors performed a cesarean section on her on Monday due to the seriousness of her condition.



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source | Hawaii health officials announced Monday afternoon that the state recorded its first death related to the swine flu.

The victim was a patient in his or her 60s. The patient died at Tripler Army Medical Center on June 19.

The patient contracted pneumonia as a complication to the H1N1 influenza, officials said.



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source | A 60-year-old woman who died Monday in Uruguay became the country’s first swine flu fatality, the ministry of public health said.

“Late today a woman died in Montevideo with multiple organ failure and tests confirmed the presence of the A(H1N1) virus,” the ministry said in a statement.

Uruguay has 195 confirmed cases of swine flu, including 12 requiring hospitalization, according to the ministry.



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source | Long Island’s Suffolk County has recorded a third death linked to Swine Flu.

County health officials said Monday the victim, a Babylon man between the ages of 65 and 75, had an underlying medical condition.



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source | A man in 70s has become the second person in Saskatchewan to die from swine flu.

The provincial Ministry of Health announced the death on its website, saying that the unidentified man had a serious underlying health condition.

The province recorded its first swine flu-related death Sunday – a woman in her 40s.

Dr. Moira McKinnon, the province’s chief medical officer of health, has said that the province has been expecting deaths due to this strain of flu.



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source | Novel H1N1 influenza can cause severe respiratory illness, profound lung damage, and death even in patients with no underlying conditions to make them vulnerable, a team of physicians from Mexico report in a rush article published online today by the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM).

The analysis of 18 patients hospitalized with H1N1 (swine) flu at the National Institute of Respiratory Diseases (INER) in Mexico during the pandemic’s earliest days reveals that fewer than half had underlying medical conditions, but more than half needed mechanical ventilation within a day of admission. Seven of the 18 died.



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